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Taking a break from your caring responsibilities.

Caring can place huge demands on your time and energy and for many carers, stress is simply a fact of life. It is important to take breaks for your own health and wellbeing. It can be easy to forget to do this, so think about how you are going to organise taking a break (often called respite care).

Respite care in the home

You might want respite care in the home, so the person you care for gets looked after at home while you take a break.

If you need regular respite or you want to be able to take a break for a few days or longer, you can get a care assistant to come and take over some of your caring duties. Some care assistants can come and 'live in' with the person you care for.

This service is not free and the cost of care would normally be paid for by the cared for person.

If you just want to get away for a few hours, the Short Break Service may be able to help you. This is a sitting service rather than full care. The service is free of charge and there is a limit on the number of hours that can be booked. If you would like to use this service you will need a carers assessment with the council.

Respite care away from the home

The person you care for may enjoy undertaking a hobby or going to an activity such as a lunch club, memory café or visiting a day centre. This may give you an opportunity for a break.

If you live in Bournemouth or Poole, Crisp (opens in a new window) has information about taking a break including holiday lodges and beach huts.

The person you care for may be able to spend time away in a residential care home or nursing home, depending on the level of care they need. This would normally be for a minimum of a week, although some homes might cater for shorter periods such as weekends. Respite can be offered as a one-off arrangement or on a regular basis.

Charges for respite care in a residential home vary with the type of home and level of care provided, and may cost an average of £500 a week depending on where you choose to stay.

The person you care for will be responsible for paying for their break unless they have been assessed by us and this is part of their care plan.

The  Respite Association (opens in a new window) or  Leonardo Trust (opens in a new window) may be able to help you if you can't afford to pay for alternative care while you take a break. They can help by offering funding towards the cost of providing suitable alternative care for a one-off short period, perhaps a weekend or a week, so you can have some quality time to yourself or with family.

Further information

You may also be interested in;

Personal care in the home

Equipment

Page last updated: 16/01/2018 16:20
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